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Twitter Valediction

I will be spending less time on Twitter. Going forward, my primary focus is to publish more often on my blog here and at EtherealMind.com and PacketPushers.net. They will be my primary focus for sharing ideas, thoughts and commentary and just a little snark.

It has been a good seven year run and twitter has lasted longer than I thought but it is time to move back to blogging at the best source. Blogging is the only permanent social media and will survive twitter/facebook/google plus. In almost every way, my own content is more satisfying and pleasing.

I would like to suggest that you directly subscribe to my blogs using an RSS subscription and a suitable RSS app. EtherealMind RSS Greg Ferro RSS and Packet Pushers.

I will continue pushing a tweet when I publish blog posts, in the same way that I do so on Google Plus, Facebook and LinkedIn but I won’t be engaging on these sites either. It possible that I might do some testing in LinkedIn but I find LinkedIn too intrusive to an enjoyable experience.

What’s Changed

Own My Content – it has become a personal goal to own more of my content. That which I write, record and share will be on sites that have my name associated. 140 characters on Twitter won’t achieve that goal.  Twitter wins most of the benefit from my content.

Distraction – Twitter has become a distraction for me that I need to control. The Noise-to-Signal ratio has increased over time. Attempts to change use patterns with less followers/different followers have made no discernible different. It is no longer useful as an information gathering tool or signal source.

Where once my time was well spent on twitter – fun, enjoyable and conversational,  I do not feel this is the case now.

Curated Feeds – This article from Wall Street Journal is the final motivation to make a change. Twitter is moving towards ‘curated’ feeds where an algorithm will make choices about what I see from the people I follow. This creates an incomplete view of what you say online and I will no longer reliably see what you have to say. In which case, what is the point ?

Equally, that which I publish to share with you will no longer reliably reach you.

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Note that this is a primary reason for not using Facebook. If I post something there, less 10% of people who follow the account will see the post. Its not practical to follow me on Facebook since you won’t see most

Valediction

Lets try this and see how it goes. I need to be productive in other places and reducing twitter is one part of a strategy. I may occasionally popup since I will have twitter apps on my iPhone only just to keep an eye on things. I have a quasi-regular tool that tweets some snark and I will be tweeting about appearances and commercial events. I’m not quitting twitter, just scaling back to the minimum.

If you would like to engage/contact me then send me an email at [email protected] and I should have more time to respond to you.

Vale, Twitter, at least for a while.

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Comments

  1. I’m doing exactly the same sort of thing Greg, for many of the same reasons.
    Cheers,
    Brad

  2. “Distraction – Twitter has become a distraction for me that I need to control. The Noise-to-Signal ratio has increased over time. Attempts to change use patterns with less followers/different followers have made no discernible different. It is no longer useful as an information gathering tool or signal source.”

    Just this week I culled my list of ~250 people I follow down to ~80 people in a special list in an attempt to improve the SNR. The list has not helped a jot. I have been trying to engage Twitter more in an attempt to foster community and develop closer relationships to those whose company I enjoy IRL, but am finding it utterly impossible. Twitter demands too much attention to truly be “keeping up.” When I reply several hours (or even days) later, the response is to content that has long since been forgotten about for the most part.

    Since I only check in with Twitter once or twice a day, keeping up is not possible. Hundreds of tweets will have gone by, the vast majority of which are not interesting to me. Lots of people in the networking industry tweet obsessively about their alcohol consumption or an endless stream of overwrought memes, as if the jokes were not yet old. That’s a change from even just a year ago. Now I see more selfies and “dumbed down” content than ever. This is the reason I left Facebook years ago, but it seems the Facebook conversation has moved to Twitter. I suppose I’m as guilty as any.

    The WSJ was news to me, and I read it with interest. Feed curation is simply a horrible idea. It’s an algorithm designed as a marketing tool, and nothing more. It’s so transparent, it’s embarrassing that Twitter is trying to disguise it as something in the best interests of Twitter users. Clearly, the end result of such an algorithm will be to stick the tweets of people who pay to be promoted into the timelines of people who didn’t ask for them. The end result practically speaking will be *more* noise, not less. This is the price we pay for Twitter, because nothing is truly free.

    I also agree that blogging is still where it’s at. I’m finding that consumption of my blog posts continues to climb. Newsletter and RSS subscribers continue to climb. The quality and volume of comments has started to pick up as well, perhaps a sign that others are abandoning Twitter as a conversational tool, too. I do still see plenty of blog referrals from Twitter, although a diminishingly small number of referrals from G+ or LinkedIn. Interestingly, LinkedIn *sharing* is quite high, often as high or higher than Twitter, but the referrals from LI are comparatively few.

  3. Good to hear Greg, love the blog and the podcast.

  4. Derick Winkworth says

    Yeah, I should get back to writing too. Twitter is unsatisfying overall, lately.